Sunday, February 16, 2014

Next steps

After I had worked out how to get my pages prepared for binding, I turned my attention to the covers.  I knew I wanted to use aluminium as the covers - it is light, yet a metal, sturdy, yet not too overwhelming. The colour would also match the shim I was using to bind the edges of the burnt pages.

I decided I wanted the back cover to look a bit like the burnt pages themselves.  So I did a sugar-lift etching to get the look.

First of all I painted the sugar solution on in a manner that was similar to the burnt page look. Kind of.



I let that dry, then covered it with bitumen. And let that dry. Patience Fiona, patience!


And loved the way it photographed from above - could become my new profile picture!


Then it was boiling water to get the sugar to lift (hence sugar-lift!), and into the etching solution, a copper sulphate and salt mix.

I wanted to use words on the front cover so I drew them onto the aluminium by hand - very freely - and then coloured them in with shellac. And let it dry. Then the front cover was popped into the same solution. Here is my test run...



Lucky for me and my patience, they both etched as I wanted, so I didn't have to repeat the process!
And then it was onto choosing which thread to use when binding it all. I can feel the finish line edging closer with this book...

18 comments:

  1. The last image is beautiful. Is that the finished effect?The burnt page look on the back cover will be very effective too. Looking forward to seeing it when finished.

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    1. Thank you Robyn! Yes the last picture is how the cover will look...I'm really happy with how it has worked. The back cover will be more shiny with the burnt bits etched in...like the pages. Go well, F

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  2. me too - am looking forward to seeing this book finished. The experiments worked incredibly well. x And I think that image would be a fabulous profile pic!

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    1. What a great profile shot that would be! The experiments have worked well, so I am hopeful it will hold...thanks for the support!

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    1. Thanks Jo, it is coming together I think.

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  4. I must try this bitumen paint! I saw a course advertised the other day and it was all about using bitumen with other resists on lino before etching by covering with caustic soda suspended in wallpaper paste. There are always so many things to try. Now I want to try shellac as well after seeing such beautiful results. Your patience has been rewarded Fiona - these images are fantastic!!

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    1. You are so right Lesley about so many things to try! The bitumen is a brilliant stop out and the shellac has worked really well too - with the copper sulphate etch, not sure about acid? I have seen some amazing caustic etches into Lino I think...happy play!

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  5. The cover should look great Fiona and I love the possibly new profile pic!

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    1. I was sooooo happy with that cover Helen! And love the idea of that profile pic...

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  6. ~these pictures make my heart skip a beat...patience indeed...what a process to wait for...wondering what will emerge from such...a beautiful and fascinating process you shared...much love light and blessings~

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    1. Sorry for my tardiness Brandi - being on the road always leaves me a bit lost with comments! There was much patience required, but then…the result was worth it. I was pretty happy I didn't get all frustrated with it and stop!

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  7. Isn't is good when experiments work as hoped?! This is such a perfect example, too, of how the process itself is so rich - the different materials/elements used to achieve an effect that is completely different to what the treatment appears to be (if this makes sense - I have never tried etching in any form, so this all seems quite mysterious & magical to me!).
    I just had a look at the book pages a few posts back, & am excited to see how it all comes together - you've worked out some very unique & visually striking solutions...

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    1. So true Lisa - this process was rich and full of joy. The discovery, the testing, the waiting…all wonderful in their own way. And yes, the results were worth the wait - all I had hoped for. Sorry for the delayed responses; home from a road trip and getting re-organised!

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I appreciate your thoughts and comments; thanks for taking the time.