Tuesday, April 14, 2015

The red centre II

We had travelled to central Australia so that I could see Uluru - and yet it took me some days to really make my way towards it.  We were really fortunate that our room had a view, so I could look out at any point in the day and watch what was happening.

We did some sunset and sunrise viewings, but it wasn't until day three that we actually drove all the way there to visit and walk around it.

This was in part because it it is so majestic. So imposing. Even from miles away you could feel its presence and its energy. To be truthful I was fairly in awe of it and needed to be ready to visit.

I had no idea I would feel like that.

One of the reasons folk visit the centre is to watch the fabulous change of light on Uluru and Kata Tjuta. There are special viewing places set aside for visitors to gather to watch the sun work its magic on the rock face.

This was our first sunset.

You get a slight sense of scale from the first picture to the second. If you look closely at the bottom left of Uluru in the first picture you can make out a few boulders. I have zoooooomed in on them in the second and you can see how big they are, and Uluru is, compared to fully grown trees!



And our first sunrise.


The sun was burning up the sky here - the grasses seem alight.


My special present was a helicopter ride, a chance to see Uluru and Kata Tjuta from the air.
Isn't this the most beautiful calligraphic line?


Circling around...



 Sunset from where we had dinner under the stars.



And then as I mentioned, on day three we went for a walk - it is about 10.5km around the base of Uluru and it was fairly warm even in the morning (about 33 degrees) but it was magic.

I found this heart in the rock.


The amazing formation, with Kata Tjuta to the right - 60km away.


Along the way, Barry took this, almost my favourite photo of me ever!



This was the most precious waterhole.


Turn your head upwards at the waterhole and this is the view. Stunning!


What most amazed me was the fact that having been somewhat wary of the powerful energy of Uluru, feeling as if it were warrior-like in the landscape, strong and immoveable, when we walked around it my sense of it was utterly transformed.  The energy shifted to show what a place of care and nurturing it had been for millennia; how often it had sheltered people, and provided for them. I was immensely moved.

Another sunset - this time with moonrise.


and a little while later...


 Sunrise on our last morning.


And we turned to watch the beautiful glow on Kata Tjuta.


Farewell.

24 comments:

  1. what a place, your response here is very moving, fiona, and very rich. thank you.

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    1. It is quite a place Velma, and I was so interested to observe my responses. Glad you enjoyed the trip alongside me. Go well.

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  2. These pictures are almost other-worldly ... the colors and the light so captivating.
    We have an uplift here in Texas called Enchanted Rock and I'm embarrassed to say we haven't been yet ... but you have inspired me to see it sooner rather than later.
    Thank you for a wonderful post!

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    1. I hope you get to Enchanted Rock soon Liz! It sounds like it would offer similar beautiful light...

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  3. What beautiful photos! Thanks for sharing your impressions both visually and in words.

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    1. Thanks Sharmon - I deliberately took our best camera as I hope to capture its beauty as best I could! It was a pretty special time and place. Go well.

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  4. thank you for finding the heart in The Rock

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    1. It felt like such a gift Mo - it was high high up and I zoomed and caught it. It's almost perfect isn't it?

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  5. Thanks for this amazing travelogue on Uluru. What a fantastic place!

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    1. Glad you enjoyed the visit Connie Rose; so nice to share it with those far far away...go well.

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  6. I was there not all that long ago. Being there was mystical! And ever so beautiful. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Diane you know just what I mean then! It's pretty fabulous I must say.

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  7. Majestic and awe-inspiring. Wonderful photographs, Fiona.

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    1. Thanks Carol - it was both majestic and awe-inspiring. A great visit and I shall always remember it. It was definitely worth taking the bigger camera for these shots - the light is so stunning...

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  8. Hi F - great shots, great memories, great photo of you in Mala Canyon. B

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    1. All of the above B! Great memories and I do love that photo you took - thanks!

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  9. Thank you for the photographs of this amazing rock and the landscape around it.

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    1. Thank you maya - I'm glad you could enjoy the experience from afar; it's pretty special place. Go well.

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  10. How wonderful to see not only your simply breathtaking photos, but also to read your narrative of the adventure/experience that this visit was for you. I think you've done an amazing job of conveying the emotion of this living "rock" - and thank you for sharing how it affected you - the inspiration is tangible!

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    1. It was funny in a way to write this post; but the experience was so personal that to record images without the felt experience felt like a sham; so you got my responses and reactions as well and I'm glad they were OK. Even now I look upon this place with great reverence and feel honoured to have visited. So interesting...glad you enjoyed; maybe pencil it in for your next trip to Oz! Go well.

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  11. Even more envy than the last post. Just beautiful. Booking a plane ticket as I write....... if only!

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    1. Ahhh Lesley - it is a truly wonderful place to visit; if ever the ticket gets bought - let me know and I'll join you!

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I appreciate your thoughts and comments; thanks for taking the time.