Sunday, April 12, 2015

The red centre

A couple of weeks ago Barry and I headed to Central Australia for a mini-break and a celebration.

I had never visited Uluru (formerly known as Ayers Rock) and I felt it was an important part of Australia to see.

The landscape is wide and open; not really desert-desert; and the light and the colours just beautiful...

As you fly in, you cruise above salt lakes...


I love the mark-making of the spinifex and its gorgeous get green colour against the red earth., and beginning to understand the important role fire plays in renewing these desert plants.




On our first day, we visit Kata Tjuta (formerly know as The Olgas). This is a collection of around 37 boulder-like, mountain-like rock formations.  They appear like a family grouping and somehow very comfortable in the earth, tethered and nurturing. It was lovely to see them from a distance and then gradually get closer and closer.

The sky was overcast and gave them a very soft and gentle light, radiating from within almost.



 You can see from the trees, and the people below, just how large they are.

And as we walked, through and around them, the light changed and they became more orange, more red...


We did a long walk, through the valley of the Winds, with views like this to reward us. Looking forward to where we're headed,


and looking back to where we've been.


As we returned to where the car was, the sun came out, the sky cleared a bit and the redness  and boldness appeared.


Along the way there were many magical moments.

We built and added to traveller's cairns along the path.


And enjoyed seeing these guys...




It is such a beautiful place, awe-inspiring in the true sense of the word, and very very special.  I'll be back with Part 2 soon - Uluru.

16 comments:

  1. These are spectacular pictures ... and I especially like the concept of the travelers' cairns

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    1. Thanks Liz - it is a very special place. I love traveller's cairns as well and we contributed to many along this path...

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  2. the red heart of this ancient land

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    1. so very very true Mo - a magnificent heart.

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  3. What a magical place (and it seems all the more so when read about on a cold, grey, wet Lancashire afternoon)

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    1. I can only imagine the contrast Jac! But yes, it is so very very special and I am forever grateful that we went.

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  4. Wonderful photos. You've conveyed the magic of the place so well.

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    1. Thanks Jo - I sometimes think it is impossible to give a sense of the scale and the space and the air...but these do give hints of the beauty and the magic. Its just amazing.

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  5. oooo lovely --- my parents love this part of the world so much - they return and camp almost every winter (and have done so for almost 2 decades) --- I've never made the trek...... 'one day' (for now I can enjoy your pics and tales)

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    1. I can imagine an annual pilgrimage of sorts Ronnie - it is a remarkably special place. We have many in this wide open country, but this one, it really speaks. More photos on Tuesday I promise, and then I hope you might get there for yourself one day.

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  6. A truly beautiful part of Australia that I WILL one day visit. Your photos make it even more enticing. There seems to be something magical about this place. Thanks Fiona.

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    1. Lyndell it took me a long time to get there, but I am so pleased I did. It's hard to convey the magic, the mystery, the energy and the aura of the place without sounding like a hippy trippy dippy type, but its ever so special. Go well.

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  7. What a wonderful journey, and your photos certainly give a sense of the scale/space - not to mention the colors, marks & impact of fire (I especially liked the "radiating" patterns seen in images 3 & 4). It will be fun to see more of your impressions from this amazing visit...

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    1. It was great visit Lisa - and the scale! It's immense. I love the radiating burn bit stop - just such lovely marks. I'll see where it all takes me...

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  8. Fiona, these gorgeous photos make me want to get on a plane. This has to be one of those places on my list of places to see before you know what happens. They are stunning views and you bring the trip to life so vividly.

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    1. It's a wonderful landscape Lesley - full of awe and majesty; and so so ancient...you'd love it I'm sure.

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I appreciate your thoughts and comments; thanks for taking the time.