Thursday, July 18, 2013

Thursday Thoughts...

“The meaning of the work is in the doing of it.” 

Cy Twombly

An interesting thought to read from Cy Twombly whose work is so beautiful, sublime and almost not there sometimes.

In a way, this was unexpected for me - perhaps my own prejudices come forth here, but I am not used to great artists paying attention to the process, the making, the doing. So much capital A art seems to be discussed as about the inspiration, the intent, the message and the meaning... rather than celebrating the making.

This quote seems to say to me that the message of the work is in the making, not what it purports to represent or the political or social commentary that can be attributed to it afterwards.

I am a maker and proud to be so, and I love exploring the processes, both the physical and the existential, that occur as we work towards something. I am no student of art or Art and cannot claim to have any great insights or knowledge or learnings, I am just pleased to see somebody whose work I admire celebrating the process!

©2009 Fiona Dempster, Sashiko in Tatebayashi
And once again the world has turned and I am joining in the monthly challenge to find the rainbow - also known as Roy.G. Biv. This month we are looking for indigo - the hardest colour I think - and this is some indigo-dyed fabric with Sashiko stitching. You'll find more indigo and more links over with Jennifer and Julie.

This stitching tells a story I am sure, and shares its meaning.

16 comments:

  1. Being a process-oriented person myself, I enjoyed this discussion. I think we discover so much during the process about the materials and ourselves. I love that bit of indigo Sashiko. Thanks so much for participating each month.--Julie

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    1. I agree Julie - the learning and the knowing is in the process. Go well.

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  2. Great quote... I'm completely enamored with the making process - the state of awareness it brings me to, the peace I find - like a meditation - while painting. I'm less interested in the other parts of art - promotion, etc. I do enjoy exhibiting as I enjoy sharing and knowing what others see. But truly, the making is what keeps me going.

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    1. I agree Valerianna - the making is a special place, and a special experience. It is quite meditative isn't it?

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  3. Hi Fiona, I am definitely a small "a" artist and completely happy being so. That sashiko pattern certainly does tell a tale. It is a Shippo pattern which means either "four directions" or "seven treasures". The seven treasures relating to the seven treasures of Buddha (being gold, silver, lapis, agate, pearl, coral and crystal/amber). Don't you just love hidden languages and meanings.

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    1. Yay for small 'a' Rob! Thanks too for the info on the pattern - it adds so much. I do love hidden meanings...

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  4. Me too! When people ask me I say I am "a maker of things" The 'things' vary from day to day, but I find such enjoyment in the making process.
    Your indigo piece is STUNNING!

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    1. It's a good way to be isn't it Kim? There is so much pleasure and enjoyment in the process.

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  5. big or small, it does not matter. the process and the depth and the quality do.

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    1. Hmmm I like this V - am pondering the notion of depth right now.

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  6. Love Cy Twombly, a great quote! Just doing it is so often the most pleasurable part of being an artist (and I'm a small a type!)

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    1. I like being a small 'a' type! Somehow in the doing it feels as if I've come home, as if this is the place for me... I love those moments when you're far away doing stuff.

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  7. The process, as the journey, reveals the true meaning of the work. Just like life.

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    1. Very nice comparison Jo - you've nailed it!

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  8. Oh yes, I'm a firm believer in enjoying the process of art, which is probably why I shy away from anything with a deadline. It ruins the enjoyment. Sometimes I'm quite disappointed when I've completed a piece....it's like coming to the end of a good book.

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    1. I agree Robyn; something wonderful about the process is the lack of timeframe; as if you have all the time in the world to explore what happens next. I understand that feeling of sadness at completion - the emptiness and what now?

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I appreciate your thoughts and comments; thanks for taking the time.